Sak Pase? ‘Wakanda’ sends love letter to Haiti

Letitia Wright poses for photographers upon arrival for the premiere of the film 'Black Panther: Wakanda Forever' in London, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2022.
Letitia Wright poses for photographers upon arrival for the premiere of the film ‘Black Panther: Wakanda Forever’ in London, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2022.
Photo by Scott Garfitt/Invision/Associated Press

Cross your heart and pretend to be transported to the comic book world of fantasy “Wakanda Forever” because the film travels to the undersea dynasty of Talokan and real world locations of Mexico, the USA and Haiti in order to showcase a sequel, requiem and epic production.
In tribute to Chadwick Boseman, the star of “Black Panther” the follow-up features sentimental scenes and travelogues depicting the beauty of Ayiti.
While all destinations are identified by geographic or government markers, the French-creole nation is particularly distinguishable by the vernacular of the natives, the lush landscape, colorful tap-tap transportation and a boy named Toussaint.
Spoiler alert — the Caribbean location is where the Black Panther/King T’Challa’s widow Nakia (Lupita Nyong’o) migrated to find solace following the death of her King T’Challa (Boseman).

Lupita Nyong'o poses for photographers upon arrival for the premiere of the film 'Black Panther: Wakanda Forever' in London, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2022.
Lupita Nyong’o poses for photographers upon arrival for the premiere of the film ‘Black Panther: Wakanda Forever’ in London, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2022. Photo by Scott Garfitt/Invision/Associated Press

Aerial views from Cap-Haitien marks the spot.
Already established in the 2018 blockbuster movie about a superhero from an advanced, fictional African kingdom, the saga continues a lovefest expressed in gestures and appreciation of the continent.
Needless to say, the king is dead.
How and why he died is not fully explained.
Director Ryan Coogler seemed to gingerly maneuver a script avoiding details of a sudden death in order to honor the legacy of the beloved actor who died much too soon in 2020.
Coogler was delicate and respectful in honoring the legacy of the beloved actor.
Simultaneously, he spared little in telling a credible tale of adventure.
By baring the pain reflected through grief shown by the king’s mother, Queen Ramonda (Angela Bassett); detached attitude from his scientist sister and Princess Shuri (Letitia Wright) with lingering agony displayed by the all-female Dora Milaje army and pervasive sadness throughout the kingdom, Coogler forced the audience to reconcile the loss.
Fans of the Marvel Cinematic Universe anticipated a feature that would neatly wrap a credible storyline.
Who would succeed King T’challa?
How to honor the king?
What role would M’Baku (Winston Duke) play?
What about Kilmonger (Michael B, Jordan) Okoye (Danai Gurira)?
Then there were those who begged a plotline explaining vibranium possession, the miracle herb and concoction unique to the region, the stunts, enemies of the kingdom, the west etc etc…
Nicely wrapped in two hours 41 minutes, he managed to integrate fashion fabulous cinematography, a diverse music score for a soundtrack which features Barbadian, Rihanna, Nigerian Tems, Burna Boy, Senegal’s Baaba Maal, Swedish composer Ludwig Goranson, Blue Rojo from Mexico, South African music and Spanish, English and Mayan rap.
Unfortunately, though, there is no Haitian zouk to savor.
Haiti provides a respite for recovery from grief, enlightenment instead of vengeance, hope after despair and perhaps promise with simplicity.
The island contrasts the high-tech, futuristic setting of Wakanda to pay tribute to the superlative human being/and actor who died much too soon.
The film also compiles sentiments from a cast aching to send a love letter to the star, hero, husband, friend and the first Black republic in this hemisphere.
A dedication at the end acknowledges the bond shared despite not knowing the pain Boseman must have endured battling colon cancer.

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